Programs

Sunday 19 April

Hiromi Tango: NatureNurture in the rose garden

1 – 2pm, QUT Art Museum

Painstakingly woven together by hand, Hiromi Tango creates tactile and immersive environments that are constructed from donated material and fabrics that evoke a sensory experience. Both recent and current projects focus on her long-standing research interests in the potential for visual and performative arts to contribute to social, emotional, and neurological development and recovery.

For the exhibition Garden, Tango presents Rose garden and NatureNurture 2015 – works that combine to create an immersive environment through which Tango pushes the viewer to use their olfactory senses to inhale the essential oils sprinkled on the objects, exploring natural metaphors for brain development and recovery. These works consider how we might nurture synaptic pathways in the memory to effect recovery.

On Sunday 19 April, this environment will be brought to life. You are invited to celebrate the transformative nature of art and the environment by meeting and interacting with its inhabitant.

Sunday 19 April

Damon Young: Philosophy in the garden

2pm Old Government House

In his book Philosophy in the garden, Damon Young explores one of literature's most intimate relationships: authors and their gardens. For some, the garden provided a retreat from workday labour; for others, solitude's quiet counsel. For all, it played a philosophical role: giving their ideas a new life.

Join Damon as he discusses why Marcel Proust had bonsai beside his bed, what Jane Austen was doing coveting an apricot, and how Friedrich Nietzsche was inspired by his 'thought tree'.

Held in conjunction with the exhibition Garden, the lecture will be followed by a book signing by the author at QUT Art Museum. Books can be purchased on the day.

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Tuesday 19 May

Texta book club: The forgotten rebels of Eureka by Clare Wright

6pm QUT Art Museum

Texta is no ordinary book club; it's for people who love art. We use fiction (mostly) to unpack the subjects, themes and emotions of art. Conversation is never colourless, and is facilitated by our brains trust from QUT Creative Writing and Literary Studies. For our second book of the year we tackle the non-fiction title, The forgotten rebels of Eureka by Clare Wright.

The Eureka Stockade. It's one of Australia's foundation legends – yet the story has always been told as if half the participants weren't there. But what if the hot-tempered, free-spirited gold miners we learned about at school were actually husbands and fathers, brothers and sons? What if there were women and children right there beside them, inside the Stockade, defending their rights while defending themselves against a barrage of bullets? As Clare Wright reveals, there were thousands of women on the goldfields and many of them were active in pivotal roles. The stories of how they arrived there, why they came and how they sustained themselves make for fascinating reading in their own right. But it is in the rebellion itself that the unbiddable women of Ballarat come into their own.

Held in conjunction with the exhibition Quaternary, join us for a brief tour of the exhibition followed by a glass of wine and generous amounts of healthy conversation.

Books can be purchased from the Gardens Point QUT Bookshop.

register

Tuesday 20 October

Texta book club: Clean straw for nothing by George Johnson

6pm QUT Art Museum

Texta is no ordinary book club; it's for people who love art. We use fiction (mostly) to unpack the subjects, themes and emotions of art. Conversation is never colourless, and is facilitated by our brains trust from QUT Creative Writing and Literary Studies. For our final book of the year we read Clean straw for nothing by George Johnson.

In the sequel to his semi-autobiographical novel My brother Jack, George Johnston's Clean straw for nothing (winner of the Miles Franklin Award in 1969) is set against the backdrop of a Greek island, and follows the story of successful war correspondent and retired journalist, David Meredith, as he abandons his career for a life in exile with his beautiful wife Cressida. Johnston focuses on the developing relationship between David and Cressida, exploring the complex and reflective character of David as he questions the nature of success, sexual tensions, expatriation, and ill-health.

Held in conjunction with the exhibition 1969: The black box of conceptual art, join us for a brief tour of the exhibition followed by a glass of wine and generous amounts of healthy conversation.

Books can be purchased from the Gardens Point QUT Bookshop.

register

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