2016 events

Artists floor talk

the churchie national emerging art prize

Saturday 5 November 2pm QUT Art Museum

Local finalists from this year's churchie national emerging art prize discuss their work and the Prize: featuring Aaron Butt, Brooke Ferguson, Elizabeth Willing, Kate Woodcroft (from Catherine or Kate), and Katherine Clayton.

Image:
Elizabeth Willing Pink Poles 2016
Icy poles
Courtesy the artist

photo of many coloured icy poles

Texta book club

Treading Air by Ariella Van Luyn

Tuesday 11 October, 6pm, QUT Art Museum

Texta is no ordinary book club; it's for people who love art. We use fiction (mostly) to unpack the subjects, themes and emotions of art. Conversation is never colourless, and is facilitated by our brains trust from QUT Creative Writing and Literary Studies

To coincide with the the churchie national emerging art prize, our fourth and final book of the year is Treading Air by Ariella Van Luyn.

In 1920s Brisbane, Lizzie O'Dea wants to get away from her dad and the memories of her mum that haunt her. At the races, she meets attractive, war-scarred Joe. When he says that he wants to marry her and take her away to far-flung Townsville, Lizzie sees her chance to escape. But Lizzie soon falls through what she'd thought was a safety net. On the fringes of society, she discovers a new sense of independence and sexuality, love and friendship. It's a precarious life, though. Always on the edge of collapse, eventually it spins out of control.

Join us for a brief tour of the exhibition followed by a glass of wine and generous amounts of healthy conversation about Treading air.

Treading Air by Ariella Van Luyn

Publication Launch

Frontier Imaginaries Ed. No1

Saturday 13 August, 2pm, QUT Art Museum

Moderator

Vivian Ziherl (IMA Curatorial Fellowship 2015, QUT Visual Art Alumni)

Guests

Amelia Barikin (Art History, University of Queensland), Amanda Cahill (Centre for Social Change), Léuli Eshraghi (PhD Candidate, Monash University), Dale Harding (artist), Pekeri Ruska (WAR, The Black Rising)

August 13 will mark the final weekend of the Frontier Imaginaries launch edition held in Brisbane with the Life of Lines at QUT Art Museum and No Longer at Ease at the Institute of Modern Art. The launch of the first Frontier Imaginaries publication offers the opportunity to toast the edition, and to reflect upon how, why and with what tools locally-focused projects can be meaningfully connected across vastly separate geographies.

Are publications valuable means of transmitting the specific work of an exhibition across time and territories? Do more recent communications technologies offer other tools that may be more useful? From the art-making perspective, what can be learned and/or contributed to the approaches of current social movements that strive to effect local change within systems of globalised power-relations?

Following from the success of the Artist Assemblies held at the opening of Frontier Imaginaries, this Publications Assembly will invite contributions from artists, curators, art-historians and leading figures from within local social movements for a public dialogue that foreshadows the next phase of the project as the 8th Jerusalem Show, held upon the invitation of the Al Ma'mal Foundation for Contemporary Art and as part of the Qalandiya International 2016.

That deadman dance by Kim Scott

Texta book club

That deadman dance by Kim Scott

Tuesday 2 August, 6pm, QUT Art Museum

Texta is no ordinary book club; it's for people who love art. We use fiction (mostly) to unpack the subjects, themes and emotions of art. Conversation is never colourless, and is facilitated by our brains trust from QUT Creative Writing and Literary Studies

To coincide with the exhibition Frontier Imaginaries: The life of lines and Reconciliation at QUT, our third book for the year is Miles Franklin Award winner, That deadman dance by Kim Scott.

Bobby Wabalanginy never learned fear, not until he was pretty well a grown man. Sure, he grew up doing the Dead Man Dance, but with him it was a dance of life, a lively dance for people to do together ... Told through the eyes of black and white, young and old, this is a story about a fledgling Western Australian community in the early 1800s known as the 'friendly frontier'.

Poetic, warm-hearted and bold, it is a story, which shows that first contact did not have to lead to war.

Join us for a brief tour of the exhibition followed by a glass of wine and generous amounts of healthy conversation about The deadman dance.

That deadman dance by Kim Scott

Texta book club

Mr Mac and me by Esther Freud

Tuesday 7 June, 6pm, William Robinson Gallery, Old Government House

Texta is no ordinary book club; it's for people who love art. We use fiction (mostly) to unpack the subjects, themes and emotions of art. Conversation is never colourless, and is facilitated by our brains trust from QUT Creative Writing and Literary Studies

To coincide with the exhibition Inspirations: William Robinson, our second book of the year is Mr Mac and me by Esther Freud.

It is 1914, and Thomas Maggs, the son of the local publican, lives with his parents and sister in a village on the Suffolk coast. Life is quiet and shaped by the seasons then one day a mysterious Scotsman arrives. To Thomas he looks like a detective, in his black cape and hat of felted wool. Mac is what the locals call him when they whisper about him in the inn. But Mac isn't a detective, he's the architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh, and together with his red-haired artist wife, they soon become a source of fascination and wonder to Thomas.

Join us for a brief tour of the exhibition followed by a glass of wine and generous amounts of healthy conversation about Mr Mac and me.

Mr Mac and me by Esther Freud

Texta book club

The mountain by Drusilla Modjeska

Tuesday 26 April, 6pm, QUT Art Museum

Texta is no ordinary book club; it's for people who love art. We use fiction (mostly) to unpack the subjects, themes and emotions of art. Conversation is never colourless, and is facilitated by our brains trust from QUT Creative Writing and Literary Studies

To coincide with the exhibition Painter in paradise: William Dobell, our first book of the year is The mountain by Drusilla Modjeska.

In 1968, Papua New Guinea is on the brink of independence, and everything is about to change. Amidst the turmoil filmmaker Leonard arrives from England with his Dutch wife, Rika, to study and film an isolated village high in the mountains. The villagers' customs and art have been passed down through generations, and Rika is immediately struck by their paintings on a cloth made of bark. Rika and Leonard are also confronted with the new university in Moresby, where intellectual ambition and the idealism of youth are creating friction among locals such as Milton–a hot-headed young playwright–and visiting westerners, such as Martha, to whom Rika becomes close. But it is when Rika meets brothers Jacob and Aaron that all their lives are changed forever.

The mountain by Drusilla Modjeska

Artist talk

Charles Robb

Saturday 5 March, 2pm, QUT Art Museum

Charles Robb's studio practice is shaped by his interest in the identity of the making process itself; an 'alter-subjectivity' that can be said to be separate to that of the artist. Prior to the official opening of his exhibition, join Charles for a discussion about his practice and work Catacoustics III.

Charles ROBB
Catacoustics (installation detail)
Metro Arts, Brisbane, 2015
Photo: Carl Warner

Catacoustics III by Charles Robb

Floor talk

Painter in paradise: William Dobell in New Guinea

Saturday 5 March, 2.30pm, QUT Art Museum

Prior to the official opening of Painter in paradise: William Dobell in New Guinea, join exhibition curator Natalie Wilson as she discusses the curatorial narrative behind the exhibition.

William DOBELL
Love song 1952
oil on hardboard
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney
Purchased 1964

Love song by William Dobell

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